• Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development
  • Building development

Broadway

Building development

14-18 Broad Street - The Broadway building we know and love has changed a lot since it opened as a regional film theatre in the 1960s.

The building was originally split between the chapel, which housed the cinema, and the church house, where the admin offices were. A New York-style alleyway ran between the buildings, and a homeless man slept on the fire escape.

Screen 1 had 534 seats. None of them were very comfortable.

The first screening as Broadway Cinema was on 31 August 1990. Since then, it has benefited from over £8 million of redevelopment funding.

In 1992 we improved the foyer, added disabled access and opened screen 2. The window in the wall of the CaféBar (posh name: ‘aedicule’) was created so that people coming out of screen 2 would see the bar in all its glory and be tempted to stay for a post-cinema drink.

Towards the end of the 90s we started letting out low-cost office space to artists and filmmakers, and merged with out biggest tenant, production and training company Intermedia.

Broadway continued to expand. In October 2006 we opened screen 3, screen 4 (designed by regular patron Sir Paul Smith) and the Mezz bar and lounge, as well as lots more work and education facilities.

Through all of this we’ve done our best to retain what it was that attracted people here in the first place.

Timelapse of the 2006 redevelopment of broadway

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